Flooded with Memories

Rushing water of the South Platte River in 1965

Rushing water of the South Platte River in 1965

For two days in June of 1965, torrential rains caused historic flooding of the Platte River in Denver.  Scott’s Liquid Gold was a tiny company based just blocks from the swollen South Platte River.

Years earlier in 1951, Ida Goldstein had purchased the formula and remaining inventory of Scott’s Liquid Gold from a door-to-door salesman.  Ida was a widow with three sons and had weathered the great depression alone. By 1965, Ida’s oldest son, Jerry, had taken on the task of building Scott’s Liquid Gold into a business.

Jerry Goldstein in 1970 after moving  the plant to its current location in Denver.

Jerry Goldstein in 1970 after moving the plant to its current location in Denver.

On June 16, 1965, Jerry watched the Platte River rise and feared that Liquid Gold and years of work would be wiped out.  It took several days for the water to recede and for local business owners to be allowed back into the flood ravaged area.  It took several more days just to get the door open to assess the damage. Jerry expected to find that everything had been washed away or broken beyond repair.  To his surprise, although severely battered and bruised, most of the bottles and equipment were intact.

Without insurance, the clean-up began. Jerry realized that as the flood waters rose, the bottles simply floated. As the water receded the bottles settled again on the dirt and mud left behind by the rushing water.

The Scott's Liquid Gold bottle in 1965.

The Scott’s Liquid Gold bottle in 1965.

With the help of his family and friends, they cleaned and sorted bottles and put the small manufacturing facility back together.  Within weeks Jerry was batching and bottling by hand and filling orders just as he had before the flood.

To encourage Jerry as he was building the company, Ida had given him a framed poem called “Don’t Quit”. Her years as a single mother during the depression had made her tenacious and she never gave up and she expected the same from her sons. The poem hung on the wall of a tiny office in the small manufacturing facility.  When Jerry first opened the door to the plant a few days following the flood the first thing he found was the poem. Like the bottles, it simply rose and fell with the flood waters.

The water-stained "Don't Quit" poem that hung on the wall at Scott's Liquid Gold

The water-stained “Don’t Quit” poem that hung on the wall at Scott’s Liquid Gold

Scott’s Liquid Gold survived the flood of 1965 and has gone on to thrive for another 50 years.  It is one of the most well-known and trusted brands in America today.  Jerry’s only son, Mark, worked with his dad for 22 years and has led the company since his father’s death in 2000.  Jerry always believed that the poem survived as a reminder to never give up on your dreams and keep going because you never know how close you are to seeing your dreams come true.  To the millions of Americans with big dreams and high hopes, we want to encourage you to keep going.  Success may be closer than you think.

 

From the poem “Don’t Quit”-

Success is failure turned inside out –

The silver tint of the clouds of doubt.

And you can never tell how close you are

It may be near when it seems afar;

So stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit –

It’s when things seem worst that you musn’t quit.

An All-American Toolbox!

Like many, I love finding unique ways to breathe new life into old obsolete household items.  While cleaning the garage storage closet  I found this old toolbox, (maybe circa 1950) that belonged to my father-in-law.  I did not want to put it in the trash or donate it but it was just sitting there collecting dust.  I took it out of the garage and started to clean it up hoping that I might be inspired to find a new use for it.  And guess what, it worked!  How about An All-American planter to brighten my porch this Fourth of July? I started by cleaning up the toolbox with a gentle, mild detergent.  I used Scott’s Liquid Gold Wood Wash. I wanted to be sure to get all the dirt off, inside and out, and remove any chemical residue.  But I also wanted to be sure it was safe for plants. You can see that it was pretty dirty! To deep clean the wood and hydrate it, I used Scott’s Liquid Gold Wood Cleaner and Preservative on the outside of the toolbox to restore the wood.  The wood was so dry and thirsty it took several applications.  When the wood looked good, I buffed out the extra oil. Then, I placed whipped topping containers in each section to catch extra water and added ten dollars worth of  red, white and ‘blue’ petunias. Added a few flags and Voila!  I have a unique planter from an old toolbox steeped in American history and ready to celebrate the Fourth of July! Wishing you and yours a safe and happy All-American Fourth of July!

An All-American Toolbox!

Like many, I love finding unique ways to breathe new life into old obsolete household items.  While cleaning the garage storage closet  I found this old toolbox, (maybe circa 1950) that belonged to my father-in-law.  I did not want to put it in the trash or donate it but it was just sitting there collecting dust.  I took it out of the garage and started to clean it up hoping that I might be inspired to find a new use for it.  And guess what, it worked!  How about An All-American planter to brighten my porch this Fourth of July? I started by cleaning up the toolbox with a gentle, mild detergent.  I used Scott’s Liquid Gold Wood Wash. I wanted to be sure to get all the dirt off, inside and out, and remove any chemical residue.  But I also wanted to be sure it was safe for plants. You can see that it was pretty dirty! To deep clean the wood and hydrate it, I used Scott’s Liquid Gold Wood Cleaner and Preservative on the outside of the toolbox to restore the wood.  The wood was so dry and thirsty it took several applications.  When the wood looked good, I buffed out the extra oil. Then, I placed whipped topping containers in each section to catch extra water and added ten dollars worth of  red, white and ‘blue’ petunias. Added a few flags and Voila!  I have a unique planter from an old toolbox steeped in American history and ready to celebrate the Fourth of July! Wishing you and yours a safe and happy All-American Fourth of July!

Celebrating 60 Golden Years!

Jerry Goldstein is still watching over Liquid Gold

Hello friends! It has been some time since we have posted on the Scott’s Liquid Gold blog. The last few months have been very busy and very exciting. We have been preparing for 2011, a year full of Golden events and opportunities.

On April 4, 2011, Scott’s Liquid Gold proudly celebrated 60 years in business! Coincidentally, it was also the 55th birthday of our President and CEO, Mark Goldstein. If that were not enough, it was also Scott’s Liquid Gold Day in the City and County of Denver! We had all the makings for a very special triple celebration. As a small American manufacturer, these are amazing milestones for the company and its 65 employees.

To celebrate this important day, we had a party for all our employees, family members, vendors, suppliers and service providers. Liquid Gold was founded in 1951, so it seemed only fitting to have a 1950’s Diner theme as our backdrop. The DJ played lots of “Oldies but Goodies” while guests enjoyed little vintage bottles of Coca-Cola and Silver Dollar hamburgers. To add a little flair, some of our employees even dressed in saddle shoes and poodle skirts.

Heidi and Jo-Ann bring the 50's to life!

In 1951, Ida Goldstein, a widow with three sons bought the formula for Scott’s Liquid Gold. She paid $350 ( a $15 deposit) to buy Liquid Gold as a small business for her sons. Oldest son Jerry, took the reins and lead the company for nearly 50 years. As Mark Goldstein (Jerry’s son) said, “Even though my dad is gone, we are still a family company. Everyone here is a member of my family.”

Cindy and Sheila, two of our best employees

A staple in American homes for more than three generations, there is a good chance you have a can of Scott’s Liquid Gold under your kitchen sink. Happy 60th Anniversary to Scott’s Liquid Gold!

“How To” YouTube

How did we ever learn to do anything before the advent of internet and social media? It was not that long ago that people went to the library to find information in a book. They still go to the library but it is often to use the internet to surf for information. That same information used to be available two rows over in Gardening or Biographies. Today people are finding information in some unusual places like YouTube.  Instead of learning by reading the information and instructions, you can simply watch a video.  Many of the videos are straight forward like, “How to Cook Trout” while others are unusual like, “How to Disco”.

Scott’s Liquid Gold is a little company in Denver that has been making a Wood Cleaner and Preservative for nearly 60 years. In the last year, Liquid Gold has realized that many people do not know how to use their Wood Cleaner and Preservative to get the best results. So the company has created a series of “How To Use Liquid Gold” videos and posted them on, you guessed it, You Tube! The current group of videos focuses primarily on wood care. Each video features an employee of the company and a personal treasure. They will add to the series some unique and interesting uses for Liquid Gold in the coming months.  Scott’s Liquid Gold would like to encourage consumers to contribute their videos as well. 

So without further ado Jeff Hinkle, VP of Marketing and Sales, will demonstrate how to preserve an antique mirror with Scott’s Liquid Gold.

Some Things Never Change

1950sThis past Sunday, many of you celebrated Easter. At Scott’s Liquid Gold, we also celebrated our 59th anniversary. Many things have changed in the last 59 years.

Let’s take a brief look at what life was like in 1951. The United states was involved in the Korean War. McCall’s Magazine for women published their first issue. The Red Skelton Show aired and the first tests of color television were commercials broadcast from the Empire State Building. Ford was developing a new car that would later be known as the Thunderbird. Gas to fill the tank cost 19 cents a gallon.  The average family income was $3,700 and  the average cost of a new home was $9,000.  Unemployment was a a mere 3.3%.

Yes, much has changed since 1951 but not Scott’s Liquid Gold. We are still one of America’s best known household products. Tried and true, we’ll be around to care for your home furnishings long after many others have come and gone.