‘First’ of Many (Brainy Ideas)

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There must be something about the warm air, green grass, rain showers and flowers of June that makes mankind opens the mind to new ideas.  June is a crazy month of ‘firsts’.  Phrases like ‘first invented’, ‘first patented’, ‘first announced, introduced and launched’ saturate the 30 days of June.

Just for fun we thought we would share some of the inventions and introductions that are still relevant today and have helped to shape daily life in America.  Listed in chronological order, the following is our Top 10 List of First Inventions and Introductions founded in the month of June.

 June 2, 1896 the first  radio patented 1896 by Guglielmo Marconi.  A source of news and information, the radio also provides entertainment.

June 4, 1896 the first car was introduced.  Henry Ford called it a ‘quadricycle’ and he took his first test drive on this day.

June 5, 1977 the first Apple computer went on sale.  Is it possible to describe the impact that Apple has had on 21st century America?

June 6, 1933 the first Drive-In movie in Hoboken, N.J in 1933.  So popular in modern America, Drive-Ins are popping up around the country again.

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June 11, 1982 the movie E.T. first premiered in 1982. Is there anyone that isn’t familiar with the phrase “E.T. phone home”?

June 19, 1846 the first baseball game was  played in Hoboken, N.J.  Like hot dogs and apple pie, baseball is now synonymous with America.

June 23, 1868 the typewriter was first patented and changed the way we communicate the written word.  What would the keyboard be without the typewriter?

June 26, 1819 the bicycle was first patented.  196 years later, as a form of transportation, the bicycle may be more important today than it was then.

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June 27, 1893 the melody for happy birthday was first published by two sisters, Mildred and Patty Hill.  It has been translated into hundreds of languages including Klingon.

June 29, 2007 the first iPhone was introduced.  How it has changed communication! Without it, texting, Snapchat, Instagram would not be possible.  You might actually have to call someone.

If these ‘firsts’ are not  enough to convince you that June is a month full of brainy ideas, the website Today in History has a calendar of historical events concerning inventions patents, trademarks and copyrights.  One for every day of the month!

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So take some time this month.  Go outside, lay in the grass, watch the clouds float by or stare at the stars.  Open your mind to the world of possibilities.  You never know what ingenious idea you might come up with that others will use in the near and distant future.

 

The Charm of an Older Home

1920s-Bungalow Do you love the rich character and history of an older home?  Do you have a favorite era? How about a 1920’s bungalow, a turn-of-the-century farmhouse or mid-century modern?  One of the wonderful things about these homes is that each has features that are uniquely their own.

a and c 2It could be a chunky mahogany banister, arts and crafts style built-ins or vaulted ceilings with wood beams.  And of course they all have beautiful hardwood floors.  Each home has generations of stories to tell and has seen a lot of life.

If it is your home today, you probably take a great deal of pride in it. You take care of it and want to show off the character and charm that make it your own.  Scott’s Liquid Gold Wood Cleaner and Preservative can help you to deep clean and condition all the natural wood in your home.  Woodwork, doors, cabinets, built-ins and furnishing will all benefit from a good dose of Scott’s Liquid Gold from time to time.

And now, Scott’s Liquid Gold can also help you to care for your hardwood floors with Floor Restore. The dog, the kids and the weather can all leave your floors looking dull and worn.

lab on floorsFloor Restore is an advanced polymer formula that bring back the life, beauty and shine to hardwood floors. It is quick, easy and leaves a durable protective finish that lasts for months.

 

We love older homes.  Simple elegance, high quality materials and that cozy well-loved feel is something that is hard to find in a newer home. 1880's floors

Let us help you to take care of your historic gem.  Mothers and grandmothers have trusted Scott’s Liquid Gold to care for their home and family heirlooms for 63 years.  You can count on us to treat your home like you do, with love and pride.

Watch the video to see how Floor Restore can work for you or visit us at scottsliquidgold.com for more information about all our products.

 

 

 

Oh How The Years Go By!

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It is hard to believe it has been over 60 years since Scott’s Liquid Gold began! It is fun to look back over the years, and see how far we have come! Wanting to showcase the journey, we created a Youtube Channel just for Scott’s Liquid Gold! ( http://bit.ly/1nwOnZk )

Take a trip down memory lane with us as we view vintage commercials! 

These commercials are a symbol of our history and we are proud to showcase them, they resemble the company’s lasting legacy that all started in a garage! garage

Are you brought back to the first time you saw one of the commercials? Do they remind you of the first bottle you ever had of Scott’s? Or maybe, you remember how your mom always had a bottle under the kitchen sink!

Getting Dirty This channel has everything, from original commercials dating back to the 70’s to ‘How to’ videos! Like Scott’s Liquid Gold, these videos have come along way, all while maintaining the common American value of a the product. As you know, commercials for our company are rare, so these vintage ones are that much more special!

Reminiscing through these commercials remind us how far we have come and how they played a role in helping Scott’s Liquid Gold become one of the most well-known and trusted brands in America today. We have truly enjoyed revisiting these classic commercials and videos, and we hope you have as well!

Flooded with Memories

Rushing water of the South Platte River in 1965

Rushing water of the South Platte River in 1965

For two days in June of 1965, torrential rains caused historic flooding of the Platte River in Denver.  Scott’s Liquid Gold was a tiny company based just blocks from the swollen South Platte River.

Years earlier in 1951, Ida Goldstein had purchased the formula and remaining inventory of Scott’s Liquid Gold from a door-to-door salesman.  Ida was a widow with three sons and had weathered the great depression alone. By 1965, Ida’s oldest son, Jerry, had taken on the task of building Scott’s Liquid Gold into a business.

Jerry Goldstein in 1970 after moving  the plant to its current location in Denver.

Jerry Goldstein in 1970 after moving the plant to its current location in Denver.

On June 16, 1965, Jerry watched the Platte River rise and feared that Liquid Gold and years of work would be wiped out.  It took several days for the water to recede and for local business owners to be allowed back into the flood ravaged area.  It took several more days just to get the door open to assess the damage. Jerry expected to find that everything had been washed away or broken beyond repair.  To his surprise, although severely battered and bruised, most of the bottles and equipment were intact.

Without insurance, the clean-up began. Jerry realized that as the flood waters rose, the bottles simply floated. As the water receded the bottles settled again on the dirt and mud left behind by the rushing water.

The Scott's Liquid Gold bottle in 1965.

The Scott’s Liquid Gold bottle in 1965.

With the help of his family and friends, they cleaned and sorted bottles and put the small manufacturing facility back together.  Within weeks Jerry was batching and bottling by hand and filling orders just as he had before the flood.

To encourage Jerry as he was building the company, Ida had given him a framed poem called “Don’t Quit”. Her years as a single mother during the depression had made her tenacious and she never gave up and she expected the same from her sons. The poem hung on the wall of a tiny office in the small manufacturing facility.  When Jerry first opened the door to the plant a few days following the flood the first thing he found was the poem. Like the bottles, it simply rose and fell with the flood waters.

The water-stained "Don't Quit" poem that hung on the wall at Scott's Liquid Gold

The water-stained “Don’t Quit” poem that hung on the wall at Scott’s Liquid Gold

Scott’s Liquid Gold survived the flood of 1965 and has gone on to thrive for another 50 years.  It is one of the most well-known and trusted brands in America today.  Jerry’s only son, Mark, worked with his dad for 22 years and has led the company since his father’s death in 2000.  Jerry always believed that the poem survived as a reminder to never give up on your dreams and keep going because you never know how close you are to seeing your dreams come true.  To the millions of Americans with big dreams and high hopes, we want to encourage you to keep going.  Success may be closer than you think.

 

From the poem “Don’t Quit”-

Success is failure turned inside out –

The silver tint of the clouds of doubt.

And you can never tell how close you are

It may be near when it seems afar;

So stick to the fight when you’re hardest hit –

It’s when things seem worst that you musn’t quit.

Road Trip Anyone?

shutterstock_159237440When was the last time you took a road trip?  Memorial weekend kicks off the summer travel season and is a reminder of an American relic; the family road trip.  Many Americans have fond memories of piling in the car (no seat belts, of course) and spending a couple of days driving to visit family or a national park like Yellowstone.  Cars were simpler in the 1960’s and 70’s at the height of the American car travel. There were no TV’s, cell phones or gaming devices. Even radio was limited depending upon where you were traveling.  Cruising across Kansas,  there was little more to listen to than an AM station with the local farm report.

Dad drove and mom read the map as they tried to navigate unfamiliar territory. As a kid, travel by car meant you had to make your own fun. There were silly games like “I Spy” or the License Plate game where you tried to find license plates from all 50 states. There were letter and word games, too, like Name a Country.  It went something like this.

“I name Belgium.”

“Belgium ends in an ‘m’ so name a country that stars with ‘m’.”

“Mexico.”

And so it went until you couldn’t think of any other countries.  No one cheated, of course, because there was no Google to search the names of unusual countries on a smart phone.  You slept, sometimes in the wheel well or on the deck of the rear window. You snacked on candy and pecan logs from Stuckey’s or read a book (if you could read without getting car sick).  Most of your time was spent just looking out the window, alone with your own thoughts, watching the magnificent scenery of this enormous country roll along.

At the end of the day, dad would stop at a motel.  If you were lucky it had a swimming pool.  shutterstock_153265601A pool meant a welcome opportunity to move after sitting all day and a chance to cool off since many cars did not have air conditioning. Dinner was a hamburger at the diner next door before going to bed in a room the whole family shared.  The next day, up bright and early, it was back in the car so you could do it all over again until you reached your destination.

Today, flying is the preferred means of travel.  Faster and more efficient, there is something lost in airplane travel, something sweet and nostalgic. In a car, time is your own. You can eat when you want to, stop when you want to and cover as many miles as daylight and a tank of gas will take you. Families bond over those many hours together. Years later, a road trip can help to create memories that only the family share.

This summer, why not leave the gadgets at home, jump in the car and head out even if it just for a few hours. There are so many wonderful things to see and do across America.  Many of them you can only get to by car. Take a drive to a local tourist site like Carhenge in Alliance, Nebraska or head to Moomers for ice cream in Traverse City, Michigan. It doesn’t matter where you go the joy is in the journey.  You just might rediscover one of life’s simple pleasures, the family road trip.

Just be careful out there.

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